Task Force Activities

Social Enterprise in the Negev: Employment, Empowerment and Jewish-Bedouin Relations | Sep 12
August 17, 2017

In 2009, Itzik Zivan, a successful Israeli businessman from Caesarea, learned about a promising catering project providing jobs for Bedouin women (whose employment rates are less than 25%). Zivan joined the initiative and helped turn Al Sanabel Catering into one of Israel’s most successful social enterprises. Today, its employees (mostly single mothers) prepare 9000 meals a day for schools throughout the region. As a result, Al Sanabel is being scaled and studied for duplication in Israel and abroad, and Zivan is working with government and civil society partners to make social enterprise an integral part of a new large-scale Jewish-Arab industrial park in the Negev.

What made this social enterprise succeed in Bedouin society, Israel's the poorest and most conservative community? What does its success tell us about economic development efforts and prospects for a more shared Israeli society? 


Shootings on the Temple Mount - Arab Discourse and State-Minority Relations in the Aftermath
August 3, 2017

The July 14th shooting attack of two Druze police officers on the Temple Mount by three Arab citizens, and its aftermath, brought to the surface internal challenges within Israel's Arab community, deteriorated Jewish-Arab relations inside Israel, and reignited tensions surrounding control of the site.

Dr. Yonatan Mendel, Head of Manarat, The Van Leer Center for Jewish-Arab Relations, and Rawnak Natour, Co-Executive Director of Sikkuy, spoke to a Task Force audience on a conference call about the complexity of the events in their broader social and political context.


Conf. Call: Shootings on the Temple Mount - discourse and aftermath | July 31
July 27, 2017

The July 14th shooting attack of two Druze police officers on the Temple Mount by three Arab citizens, and its aftermath, brought to the surface internal challenges within Israel's Arab community, deteriorated Jewish-Arab relations inside Israel, and reignited tensions surrounding control of the site.

How did Jewish and Arab reactions to the attacks, and to the conflict over security measures on the Temple Mount, reflect current trends in Jewish-Arab relations and within Israel's Arab society? What are the implications for internal Arab relations in Israel and state-minority relations going forward? 


Israel Update | July 2017
July 26, 2017

Our quaterly publication covers recent developments in government, legislation, civil society, and public discourse in the field.


Shootings on the Temple Mount: Arab discourse and state-minority relations in the aftermath
July 25, 2017

Early in the morning of Friday, July 14th, a shooting attack on the Temple Mount by three Arab citizens of Israel left two Druze officers and the three assailants dead. This attack and its aftermath have reignited tensions surrounding control of the Temple Mount, deteriorated Jewish-Arab relations inside Israel and brought to the surface internal challenges within Israel’s Arab community.

Individual attacks have been ongoing in the Old City over the last two years, but this attack differed in that it took place on the Temple Mount itself, was perpetrated by Arab citizens, and that the victims were Druze. Jewish and Arab discourse in Israel in response to the attacks was heated, but has been quickly overshadowed by the wider Muslim discourse – inside Israel and around it in the West Bank and Jordan - in response to the government’s decision to close the site and install metal detectors at the entry prior to reopening the following Monday it for prayers.


Lethal clashes in Kfar Qassem underscore police-Arab tensions
July 24, 2017

On June 6th, tensions between Israel’s police and Arab citizens erupted in Kfar Qassem, when what began as an individual arrest escalated into violent protests by residents and the fatal shooting of a 27-year-old Arab man by police security. The events and their aftermath underscored longstanding tensions and mistrust between Israel’s police and Arab citizens, and the complexity of resolving them, against the backdrop of a rising tide of violent events in Arab localities. 

Many in Arab society feel that the police do not view Arab citizens as a constituency to be served, or worse, that police see Arab society as an enemy population to be contained. The rise in violent crime is seen in part as a result of decades of inadequate policing. Since the beginning of 2017, there have been 39 murders in Israel’s Arab society, five of them in the span of two weeks in May and June, and two of these in Kfar Qassem. This is out of the 55-60 murders in Israel as a whole.


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